Netsafe is New Zealand’s independent, non-profit online safety organisation. Taking a technology-positive approach to the challenges digital technology presents, Netsafe works by providing practical tools, support, and advice for managing online challenges.  https://www.netsafe.org.nz/

Message from Anne Winnall, Director Marsden Whitby, 4 March 2019
There has been a great deal of publicity given to the Momo challenge lately. I am not going to go into detail about it here but as with all online activity targeted at young people, and potentially causing them to harm themselves, it is timely for parents to be reminded of the precautions needed around your child’s online habits and behaviours. Netsafe has published some excellent advice about how parents can work with their children/teenagers to make sure they know what to do in the event of finding disturbing content – see below. We would also recommend setting up parental controls on your child’s phone or tablet to restrict access to certain apps and minimise the risk of unwanted content, and turning off ‘suggested auto-play’ on YouTube. (Can be accessed under Settings tab). It is sensible to monitor your child’s internet use on a regular basis on all devices.

Harmful Content Advisory 28 February 2019

Netsafe has received reports relating to young people who have been exposed to a harmful online “game” known as the Momo Challenge. Although we have not received any reports of young people in New Zealand taking part in the “challenge”, we are aware that some young people have seen content relating to Momo and have been very upset by the content and imagery. There has also been talk about whether this “challenge” is real or a hoax. Regardless of whether the actual challenge itself exists, individuals who come across Momo-related content may experience emotional distress at seeing it – particularly younger children. 
Netsafe encourages anyone that comes across content relating to the Momo Challenge or other similar ‘challenge’ content to immediately report it to the social media site or website that it’s on. In New Zealand, it is against the law to incite another person to take their own life. If somebody is targeting a young person to play this “game”, or attempting to incite suicide, you should contact the Police and Netsafe for help, and a mental health service for support. Netsafe can also provide advice for any parents who are concerned about this challenge. If young people are expressing feelings about self-harm or suicide, then this should be followed up with appropriate mental health support.Netsafe’s advice for parents about exposure to upsetting content:
  • Have a conversation with young people about what to do if they do come across upsetting content online
  • Let your child know that they can come to you (or another trusted adult) when they find something upsetting and they won’t get in trouble
  • Stay calm if they do come to you – don’t assign blame, reassure them that it’s not their fault and don’t punish them for seeking help
  • Normalise their feelings – let them know that it is normal to feel scared, confused or upset
  • Don’t over-react by taking away the technology – this may make them less likely to talk to you if something else happens
  • For young children in particular, consider using parental controls to block out specific keywords like “Momo”
  • If you or your child comes across this type of content report it to the platform that it’s on
  • If your child is expressing any concerning feelings, follow up with mental health support
  • If you know that a young person has been engaging in this challenge, report it to the Police and Netsafe, and contact a mental health service for support.
https://www.netsafe.org.nz/momo-challenge-advisory-february-2019/